All posts by Zand Space

Galapagos: Realm of Giant Sharks

In the far reaches of the Galapagos archipelago there is a remote island – Darwin Island. Here, a mysterious parade of giant whale sharks passes by. All of them are pregnant females, about to give birth. What has drawn them here? Where are they going?

Galapagos: Realm of Giant Sharks follows a group of researchers who have travelled out to Darwin Island to begin following these dinosaurs of the sea wherever they travel across the globe. But placing satellite tracking devices on giant sharks is not always easy. Steel spear tips bounce off, dangerous currents intervene, and the sharks can deliver bone-crushing swipes with their tails.

In an exciting blend of science and natural history filmmaking, Galapagos: Realm of Giant Sharks uses action-packed, high-resolution photography to draw audiences into the world of one of the ocean’s largest and least understood creatures.

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Cosmic Journeys – Glimpsing the Solar System’s Birth

Where do you look to glimpse the birth of a solar system like ours? Our sun is thought to have formed along with a range of stellar siblings. This star cluster likely moved out on its own, bound by gravity, in what astronomers call a “Moving Group.”

This video explores two nearby moving groups. M67, also known as the King Cobra Cluster, was once pegged as the birth place of our solar system. The evidence now says it’s not, but astronomers have now detected planets there. The other is the Beta Pictoris group, with the most famous of all solar systems in formation, Beta Pictoris. Find out how a solar system is taking shape within the fold of this hot star.

Music by Epidemic Sound (http://www.epidemicsound.com)

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Cosmic Journeys – Hubble: Universe in Motion

Since its launch 25 Years ago, the Hubble Telescope has returned images of unprecedented beauty of a dynamic and changing universe.

In this episode of COSMIC JOURNEYS, Hubble’s most iconic images are bought to life to answer some of the most important questions facing astronomers today. Colliding galaxies, the birth and death of stars, jets of gas thrown out by material crashing into distant suns: these incredible images tech us valuable lessons about how galaxies are formed, what dark matter is and even the fate of the earth itself.

Music by Epidemic Sound (http://www.epidemicsound.com)

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When A Solar Storm Engulfs Earth

What happens with a giant solar outburst on the scale of the Great Solar Storm of 1859 hits the Earth. Solar scientists got a taste of such a blast in 2012 when the Sun erupted in a giant coronal mass ejection. In one of the largest solar computer simulations ever performed, scientists tracked the impact of a massive wave of solar plasma as it slammed into Earth.

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Is the Universe Dying?

So what else is new? Science has known since the late 1990s that the universe is accelerating outward. That means it will continue to dissipate on into the future through a number of well defined epochs. A large international collaboration called the Galaxy and Mass Assembly Project (GAMA) has been surveying deep regions of the universe to find out how the energy output of galaxies has changed.

They found that a large sampling are emitting about half the energy they did two billion years ago. This is because rates of star birth are steadily declining. This is part of a slow decline in our current epoch, known as the Stellar Epoch, the epoch of stars. As one astronomer put it, the universe has settled down on the couch, while getting lazier and older. The timeline of this epoch, however, is many trillions of years into the future.

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Final Encounter: Cassini and Dione

The Cassini Spacecraft swooped in for the last of five close encounters with one of the most beautiful moons in our solar system: Dione. After more than a decade exploring the Saturn system, the Cassini-Huygens mission must be regarded as one of the most successful science missions ever. It has already amassed one of the greatest photographic collections of all time. Revel in the details of Dione out near the limits of the solar system.

Music by Epidemic Sound (http://www.epidemicsound.com)

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Ultimate Bipolar Nebula

From Hubblecast. A new Hubble Space Telescope image shows off the Twin Jet Nebula, highlighting the nebula’s shells and its knots of expanding gas in striking detail. Two iridescent lobes of material stretch outwards from a central star system. Within these lobes two huge jets of gas are streaming from the star system at speeds in excess of one million kilometres per hour.

The glowing and expanding shells of gas clearly visible in this image represent the final stages of life for an old star of low to intermediate mass. The star has not only ejected its outer layers, but the exposed remnant core is now illuminating these layers — resulting in a spectacular light show like the one seen here.

Ordinary planetary nebulae have one star at their centre, bipolar nebulae have two, in a binary star system. Astronomers have found that the two stars in this pair each have around the same mass as the Sun, ranging from 0.6 to 1.0 solar masses for the smaller star, and from 1.0 to 1.4 solar masses for its larger companion. The larger star is approaching the end of its days and has already ejected its outer layers of gas into space, Continue reading Ultimate Bipolar Nebula

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